Letter from William Henry Seward to Frances Miller Seward, January 6, 1831

  • Posted on: 11 January 2016
  • By: admin
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Letter from William Henry Seward to Frances Miller Seward, January 6, 1831
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:dgj

student editor

Transcriber:spp:sss

Distributor:Seward Family Papers Project

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1831-01-06

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Letter from William Henry Seward to Frances Miller Seward, January 6, 1831

action: sent

sender: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location: Albany, NY

receiver: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Auburn, NY

transcription: dgj 2014-05-01

revision: ekk 2015-09-08

<>
Page 1

11.

Thursday afternoon
Jan’y 6th
Another days labor is ended _ and I am to
write a few lines to you as the closing
instead of the opening business of the day.
No measure of importance, no debate of interest
has as yet occurred in the Legislature.
I rise in the morning with the idea that
I have nothing to do and that I shall have
a tedious day of indolence. I watch with
impatience the strikings of the clock till 11
go to the house am occupied at most two & a
half hours come home dine and after that
hour no man is allowed to be busy as ^for^ instance
after ^dinner at 2 o’clock^ I came up into my room wrote the two
first lines on this page was interrupted by a
call and continued receiving calls and dismissing
visitors until about sunset when I abandoned
all hope of writing one more line till every body
Page 2

12.
should have gone to bed so in despair I
sallied forth went with ,Mr Fuller
Birth: 1787-08-14 Death: 1855-08-16
of the
Senate & called on Mr S. M. Hopkins
Birth: 1772-05-09 Death: 1837-03-09
spent
half an hour with him came down to
Manchesters
Birth: 1758-08-15 Death: 1846-03-14
, took ten with him smoked
and drank a glass of wine with him &
his fellow boarders, called at Crittendens
Birth: 1787-09-10 Death: 1863-07-26

spent an hour with Mr Spencer
Birth: 1788-01-08 Death: 1855-05-17
in arrang-
ing our causes for argument in the Supreme
Court came down street and was so fortunate
as to leave my card for Mr O
Unknown
of the Assembly
at the American. Went across just to bid
good evening to Mr
Birth: 1793-06-17 Death: 1859-09-12
& Mrs Tracy
Birth: 1800-03-09 Death: 1876-03
_ dropped into
Mr Ellis
Birth: 1771-05-22 Death: 1846-04-10
room looked in upon Maynard
Birth: 1786-11-11 Death: 1832-08-28
_
came home ate supper and find myself in
my room at 1/2 past 11 o’clock. Now how
any man finds time to study and make
speeches is beyond my comprehension.
I want to look into the Salt laws and the
Canal laws _and two or three other matters
besides doing up some old business but in
truth two letters from Seth Hunt lay on my
table reproaching my negligence.
Page 3

13.
Tracy & Maynard say I must make up my [ mind ]
x

Supplied

Reason: 

never more to be worth a cent for practice
in the law Doleful prediction for a poor
man. Adieu. Heaven protect you all.