Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, January 19, 1831

  • Posted on: 11 January 2016
  • By: admin
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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, January 19, 1831
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:alc

student editor

Transcriber:spp:cef

Distributor:Seward Family Papers Project

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1831-01-19

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Letter from Frances Miller Seward to William Henry Seward, January 19, 1831

action: sent

sender: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Auburn, NY

receiver: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location: Albany, NY

transcription: alc 

revision: ekk 2015-09-09

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Page 1

Wednesday afternoon
My Dear Henry although I have just sent a letter by mail I
cannot let so good an opportunity pass. This morning some one
knocked I went to the door and found a young man
Birth: 1810-09-27 Death: 1871-06-13
standing
there whom I did not remember ever to have seen before
he said he was going to Albany tomorrow morning and if I wished
to send any thing to Mr Seward would be happy to
oblige me by delivering it. I said I would like to send
a letter, he then remarked it would be necessary
to send it up this evening as he should leave early in the
morning. I then enquired the gentleman’s name, “Burt,” was
the answer, and suddenly my eyes were opened and behold
it was Joshua. Mrs Burt
Birth: 1776-07-25 Death: 1859-12-02
will undoubtedly think it very
strange that I did not know Joshua! It was very stupid
certainly. Your Sunday’s letter came as I calculated this
morning. Your letter was interesting, all of it, and dearest you need
never fear that even politics do not interest me when in any
manner connected with you. I always read all the proceedings
of the Senate in the evening journal a thing I am sure I
never thought of doing before. I read your resolution, hardly
comprehended its import, and was very ignorant of the meaning
of laying it on the table. I do not think you vain dear one
I never did, that is I never have thought you vain since we
were married, on the contrary I shall scold you for your
diffidence soon. If you could hear half the flattering speeches
that are made to me about your talents and believe them half
as religiously as I do you would not think you had any cause
Page 2

for embarassment. I kow know you will feel differently in process of
time and perhaps think strange that you could ever have ex
perienced these sensations I have no fears for you and you
know I am sensitive to an extreme, foolishly sensitive about these
things. The letter for Lazette
Birth: 1803-11-01 Death: 1875-10-03
I shall keep until I see her
I do not know when that will be it continues so cold
I have read the Governors
Birth: 1784-08-21 Death: 1874-11-01
Message since I wrote if it is not
his own composition I think it might have been written
with ordinary abilities, it appears more a matter of
calculation than any thing else. Joe Richardson
Birth: 1776-06-05 Death: 1853-04
says it
is a grand thing. Mrs Horton
Unknown
was here today. I bought
12 lb pounds of beautiful honey of her, she said Mr Horton
Unknown
was
at home sick with his old complaint, was very inquisitive
about Cornelias
Birth: 1805-10-29 Death: 1839-01-04
going home, she had not heard from
Orange county in a long time. I had much that was near
to tell her, we promised her a visit this winter she
appears to think we do not come as often as we might.
I wrote to Cornelia on Sunday and proposed to her that
she should meet you at Albany in the Spring and
come home with you. I intend writing to George
Birth: 1808-08-26 Death: 1888-12-07
soon.
Let me know if you hear any thing from Florida.
Fred
Birth: 1830-07-08 Death: 1915-04-25
has not cut any more teeth yet though his gums
are very much swollen he must suffer a great deal of
pain but he bears it all meekly, is now riding and
singing in his little waggon beside me. Ann does make
a tolerable horse the only thing she has envinced any ingenuity
about since she came here. Gus
Birth: 1826-10-01 Death: 1876-09-11
has written what he calls
a letter to you and wishes me to take charge of it, he
says he promised Pa
Birth: 1772-04-11 Death: 1851-11-13
he would write. Your own Frances.