Letter from William Henry Seward to Frances Miller Seward, September 19, 1834

  • Posted on: 10 March 2016
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Letter from William Henry Seward to Frances Miller Seward, September 19, 1834
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:djg

student editor

Transcriber:spp:sss

Distributor:Seward Family Papers Project

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1834-09-19

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Letter from William Henry Seward to Frances Miller Seward, September 19, 1834

action: sent

sender: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location: Auburn, NY

receiver: Frances Seward
Birth: 1805-09-24  Death: 1865-06-21

location: Aurora, NY

transcription: djg 

revision: ekk 2015-06-23

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Page 1

Auburn, Friday night.
My dearest Frances,
Clara
Birth: 1794 Death: 1862-09-05
keeps note of the Aurora stage and she tells me this
letter may be sent by the mail tomorrow morning. It must be a shorter
one than I am accustomed to write for every mail brings a heavy
accession to my correspondence and I must not let it get behind.
I arrived about three yesterday afternoon well, and with my horse
somewhat improved of his lameness. It did not occur to me until
I was three miles from Ludlowville that I had left you without
money although I had furnished myself with funds expressly
to supply you. I hope if you are destitute you make no hesita–
tion at charging the matter to me.
When I reached home I found Grandmother
Birth: 1751 Death: 1835-10-03
well, no other person
in the house except the two girls
xtwo girls
x
Unknown

Unknown
. Your father
Birth: 1772-04-11 Death: 1851-11-13
had gone to Seneca
Falls
and Aunt Clara to Lazette
Birth: 1803-11-01 Death: 1875-10-03
’s. It was very solitary here.
Grandmother had had an alarm from a wild looking man
who came in and asked abruptly where the man of this
house was. That personage having neglected to communicate his
destination when he left home she was unable to give him
the desired information. He then asked where his daugh–
ters were. She replied that was none of his business and there–
upon he proceeded about his business if he had any.
Clary returned in the evening and your father this morning, He
says he left Col. Meynderse
Birth: 1767-07-11 Death: 1838-01-31
very unwell.
There is nothing very new. You will have heard of Mr Beachs
Birth: 1785 Death: 1839-08-08

nomination for the Senate. The steam having been all let
off upon his first nomination his was received without any
of the ordinary expressions of dissatisfaction. It satisfies
my views very well.
All the difficulties of which you heard so much in reference
Page 2

to a certain nomination in which you take a deep interest vanished
yesterday. To night a meeting is held at the Exchange to respond. It
is said to be a large one and to embrace all who had been dis=
satisfied.
Weed
Birth: 1797-11-15 Death: 1882-11-22
has sent me another long letter written in good
spirits but containing nothing important except that Root
Birth: 1773-03-16 Death: 1846-12-24
writes to
him “that the nomination of one of the finest fellows in the
state will revive Anti Masonry and ruin every thing . Hallett
Birth: 1797-12-02 Death: 1861-09-30

and Myron Holley
Birth: 1779-04-20 Death: 1841-03-04
shout loud for the nomination. A very
large meeting was to be held last evening to respond. to the
nomination at Masonic Hall ^New York^ . G. C. Verplank
Birth: 1786-08-06 Death: 1870-03-18
rose to pre–
side. The N.Y. American has the very handsomest article
yet published. It will glad your eyes. The Argus is yet
silent and Weed is provoking him. The New York Times says
our candidate is 26, has red hair and a long nose.
Our candidate has received notice that a formal invitation
will be presented to him inviting him to go to Syracuse and
be introduced to the Convention and of course make a
speech. He has decided that it will not be wise to attend.
and of course if his views are consulted the invitation will
not be given.
I have a letter from Jennings
Birth: 1793-08-23 Death: 1841-02-24
written at Boston. Both he
and Marcia
Birth: 1794-07-23 Death: 1839-10-28
were very well. When may I expect you and how. Kiss
the little boys
x Birth: 1830-07-08  Death: 1915-04-25  Birth: 1826-10-01  Death: 1876-09-11 
for their Pa. I hope the piano was not injured.
I shall have much company next week, the delegates to Syracuse
I do not wish to hurry you but I shall be awkwardly situated
as to receiving them. My warmest love to Lazette.
Page 3

Sept 25 1834
to Aurora
Auburn NY Sep 20
x

Stamp

Type: postmark
Mrs. William H. Seward
now at
AURORA
Cayuga Co.