Letter from Olive Risley Seward to William Henry Seward, June 1868

  • Posted on: 17 December 2021
  • By: admin
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Letter from Olive Risley Seward to William Henry Seward, June 1868
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transcriber

Transcriber:spp:maf

student editor

Transcriber:spp:axm

student editor

Transcriber:spp:cnk

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1868-06

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Letter from Olive Risley Seward to William Henry Seward, June 1868

action: sent

sender: Olive Risley-Seward
Birth: 1844-07-15  Death: 1908-11-27

location: Washington D.C., US

receiver: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location: Washington D.C., US

transcription: maf 

revision: amr 2021-07-23

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Page 1

90 Pennsylvania Avenue
Wednesday morning
My dear Mr. Seward,
I shall have
so much to say this evening
at your house and it is so
difficult to concentrate
talk . I have taken the liberty
of writing to you this morning
and of telling you very much
of all that is in my heart.
In the first place about
Hattie
Birth: 1850-03-05 Death: 1925-07-27
– she is really very
delicate, and requires constant
watching, especially at night
Page 2

when she is apt to be exceedingly
restless and nervous.
Father
Birth: 1814 Death: 1893
and Mother
 Death: 1868-09-28
think it
best to send her North, and I
cannot make it be contented
to have her go alone. Seven
hundred miles is a great distance
and if she should become
suddenly worse, I could never
forgive myself, for having
allowed her to be unprotected .
So my very dear Sir, I feel
obliged to forgoe all the pleasures
which you have in store for
me, and which are more than
Page 3

I have ever experienced, and
for the love of my dear, little
sister, go to quiet Fredonia
and devote myself to her and
to grandfather
Birth: 1787-05-07 Death: 1870-01-09
for a few
weeks. My great hope is to be
able to join you at Auburn
and return with you.
I am obliged to write so hastily
this morning. I fear I do not
express myself so that you can
understand how much I feel
and how very difficult it has
been for me to come to these
conclusions. I am only comforted
Page 4

by my conviction that I have done
right. We can now talk about it
this evening.
The lockets have not co[ me ]
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Reason: 

yet. I think I will take the[ m ]
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this evening and let you decide.
Forgive this hastily written no[ te ]
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I shall have much to attend
today, in making preparation fo[ r ]
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the journey.
Ever Affectionately yours
Olive.
Hon. W m . H. Seward.