Letter from Olive Risley Seward to William Henry Seward, July 12, 1868

  • Posted on: 20 December 2021
  • By: admin
xml: 
Letter from Olive Risley Seward to William Henry Seward, July 12, 1868
x

transcriber

Transcriber:spp:ybg

student editor

Transcriber:spp:les

Distributor:Seward Family Digital Archive

Institution:University of Rochester

Repository:Rare Books and Special Collections

Date:1868-07-12

In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "psn" point to person elements in the project's persons.xml authority file. In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "pla" point to place elements in the project's places.xml authority file. In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "psn" point to person elements in the project's staff.xml authority file. In the context of this project, private URIs with the prefix "psn" point to person elements in the project's bibl.xml authority file. verical-align: super; font-size: 12px; text-decoration: underline; text-decoration: line-through; color: red;

Letter from Olive Risley Seward to William Henry Seward, July 12, 1868

action: sent

sender: Olive Risley-Seward
Birth: 1844-07-15  Death: 1908-11-27

location: Buffalo, NY

receiver: William Seward
Birth: 1801-05-16  Death: 1872-10-10

location: Washington D.C., US

transcription: asg 

revision: rmg 2021-07-27

<>


Page 1

578 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y.
July 12 th 1868
My dear Mr. Seward,
Father
Birth: 1814 Death: 1893
left us Friday,
and I trust has reached home, he
fondly hoped we would be better off
here than in Washington, and that
may be so. I dare not think of my
dear friends there. Here the thermometer
stands at 117 all day, and the sun
had so fairly conquered the cool breezes
of Lake Erie. They dare not manifest their
selves until long past midnight. We
passed two days and nights at Niagara
Falls
, where the nights at least, are
always cool and delightful, but
with that exception I have never known
any thing like the heat we have experienced
since leaving Washington. I feel repaired
however for every discomfort for my
Page 2

my sister's
Birth: 1850-03-05 Death: 1925-07-27
health is much improved
and will, I trust soon be restored. She
begs to send her love to you.
Even after your assurances my dear
sir, that my hopes in regard to Gen.
Hancock
Birth: 1824-02-14 Death: 1886-02-09
would not be realized. I could
not give it up and was dreadfully
disappointed indeed had it not been
for the feminine luxury of tears. I
think I should have been frantic
for awhile. But it had taught me
a lesson and come what will, I fully
intend, never to interest my self deeply
in any ^ good ^ candidate whose success depends
upon that imbecile, old body, the
Democratic Party. Forgive me, for
intruding my smaller hopes and
opinions upon you. But my heart
has been full to bursting and not
one word of my disappointment has
passed my lips or pen, before –
Page 3

But I have met with several little
draw backs to complete happiness
during these last few weeks and such
a very great one, a real trial is, that
Wednesday of this week, July 15th
the anniversary of my birth day
should be passed so far from
home. I had been looking forward
to a sweet, little picnic out on Rock
Creek, where I had hoped to see
besides my dear parents and sister,
you my kind friend, with Mr.
Birth: 1830-07-08 Death: 1915-04-25
and Mrs.
Birth: 1834-03-29 Death: 1919-05-02

Frederick Seward, and perhaps Miss
Cushman
Birth: 1816-07-23 Death: 1876-02-18
. Now this must be held in
pleasant anticipation until my
return, and since I cannot invite you
to my picnic, may I ask you to drink
my health that day?
All my pretty schemes for
study and improvement this
summer are greatly interfered
Page 4

with, but I have taken up the
first book under my hand "China
and the Chinese"
x

from which I hope [ to ]
x

Supplied

Reason: hole

learn a little of the strange people
I have watched anxiously for the
Alaska bill.
I suppose Mr. and Mrs. Frederick
Seward and perhaps Miss Cushman
are at home and that your pleasant
house is again filled. I hope you
are all quite well and not suffering
from the intense hot weather.
I am at the house of my uncle
Mr.Thomas P. Grosvenor
 Death: 1881-09-13
whose little
daughter
Birth: 1846-05-13 Death: 1898-05-21
I presented to you last
winter. She now begs to send her
kindest regards to you.
I send this poor letter to father
that he will be only too happy for a
excuse to pay you a visit.
Affectionately and sincerely
yours
Olive Risley
Hon. William H. Seward